This old VFW in Germantown is being transformed into a NY-style pizza place
This old VFWon Goss Avenue is being transformed into a NY-style pizza place

A couple of neighbors from Mayfield, Ky., who dated and married while at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, plan to open a New York-style pizzeria in Germantown this fall.

That’s a roundabout and kind of geo-colorful way of saying Germantown is set to get another cool place to eat in the form of The Post, a pizzeria now under construction in the former VFW Post at 1045 Goss Ave.

The name, as you might guess, is a deliberate and appreciative nod to the building’s heritage, the soldiers who celebrated there, and the blue-collar neighborhood that supported them for many decades.

“We also wanted the name to be plain and simple, easy to remember and say—The Post,” said Laura Neely, an attorney. She and husband Nash Neely live just a few blocks from the restaurant in Germantown. “Even though Germantown has a lot of new stuff going on, we feel like it’s a neighborhood that appreciates its history. Some of the look and feel of the place will reflect its history.”

Nash Neely is leaving his job as an asset liability analyst at Republic Bank to operate the pizzeria. While working nine years as a cook, bartender and manager at Pazzo’s, a sprawling sports bar, beer and pizza pub, in Lexington, he earned his MBA and set out for a corporate job. But after five years working in a cubicle, he said the itch to return to restaurants had to be scratched.

“I’m really ready to get back to the work of it,” Neely said. “I guess I’m cut out for it.”

The centerpiece of The Post’s menu will be classic, deck-oven baked New York-style pizza. The large (usually 18 inches) pizzas are cut six or eight ways to yield 9-inch-long, floppy, foldable wedges of pie.

Just like a New Yorker would, Nash pointed out that “it might drip a little grease on your pants, but that’s part of the style.” Other than Luigi’s Pizzeria (712 W. Main St.) and Papalino’s, the couple said the city suffers from a shortage of New York-style offerings.

They acknowledged there are good pies made at Germantown stops Danny Mac’s and Come Back Inn, but they said neither place was the true pizza joint the neighborhood needs.

[googlemaps https://www.google.com/maps/embed?pb=!1m14!1m8!1m3!1d6268.301408573131!2d-85.73695313859433!3d38.22961015216425!3m2!1i1024!2i768!4f13.1!3m3!1m2!1s0x88690d25484589e1%3A0xc9d2719a7cd8136d!2s1045+Goss+Ave!5e0!3m2!1sen!2sus!4v1404401411366&w=539&h=404]

“Danny Mac’s is carryout, and as much as I like Come Back Inn, it’s not what I think of as a pizza place,” Laura said. “We want it to be a place where you meet friends, bring your family and hang out, have a slice and a beer.” (UPDATE: Danny Mac’s does have seating, just not full service.)

Fresh slices, Nash insisted.

“What we’ll always have is pizza by the slice: a pepperoni, a cheese and a slice of the day,” he began. “We won’t make cheese pizzas ahead of time and add toppings when people order them. I hate that. We’ll make fresh pizzas for our slices.”

Though the rest of the menu isn’t finalized, it will include the expected sandwiches and salads.

An all-American lineup of beer will be featured prominently at The Post. Not only does it befit the pizzeria’s theme, Laura said, “Nash and I feel there are enough great American beers that we don’t need to sell imports.”

Expect eight rotating microbrew taps, and 60 to 80 canned and bottled beers.

“Sometimes you just have to have a domestic longneck with your pizza,” Laura said. Adding liquor is a future goal following zoning changes. “But we really don’t want to do liquor sales right off the bat. We want to get our feet under us before we try that.”

The couple expects construction to be completed by mid-October, followed by a month of hiring and training.

“If we can get our occupancy permit by then, then maybe we can open mid-November,” Nash said. “But you never can tell. There’s always another inspection, another permit to get.”

Steve Coomes
Steve Coomes is a restaurant veteran turned award-winning food, spirits and travel writer. In his 24-year career, he has edited and written for multiple national trade and consumer publications including Nation's Restaurant News and Southern Living. He is a feature writer for Louisville magazine, Edible Louisville & The Bluegrass and Food & Dining Magazine. The author of two books, "Country Ham: A Southern Tradition of Hogs, Salt & Smoke," and the "Home Distiller's Guide to Spirits," he also serves as a ghostwriter for multiple clients.