2017 F-250 Super Duty 4X4 Crew Cab Lariat. | Courtesy of Ford Motor Co.

Ford is recalling more than 1.3 million F-150 and Super Duty trucks because a defective door latch could compromise driver and passenger safety.

The company estimates that the recall will cost it $267 million in the fourth quarter, according to filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Ford said that in certain 2015 to 2017 F-150 and 2017 Super Duty vehicles “a frozen door latch or a bent or kinked actuation cable may result in a door that will not open or will not close.”

The door may appear closed, but the latch may not fully engage, which means the door could open while the truck is being driven, Ford said. While the company said that it is not aware of any accidents or injuries related to the issue, it increases the risk for injury.

The Dearborn, Mich.-based automaker said that dealers would install water shields over the door latches and inspect and repair door latch actuation cables at no cost to the customer.

The recall involves about 1.1 million vehicles in the U.S., 222,000 in Canada and 21,000 in Mexico.

Affected vehicles:

  • 2015-17 F-150, built at Dearborn Assembly Plant, March 12, 2014 to Dec. 31, 2016.
  • 2015-17 F-150, built at Kansas City Assembly Plant, Aug. 11, 2014 to Dec. 30, 2016.
  • 2017 Super Duty, built at Kentucky Truck Plant, Oct. 8, 2015 to Sept. 1, 2016.

The F-Series has been the company’s best-selling vehicle, and the Super Duty, made exclusively at Kentucky Truck Plant, has helped prop up profits because consumers increasingly are opting for higher-end models of the work truck.

In September, Ford sold 82,302 F-Series trucks, up 21.4 percent from a year earlier. Through the first nine months of the year, the company has sold nearly 600,000 F-Series pickups, up 10.6 percent from the same period in 2016.

Despite the hit, Ford said that it still expected to earn between $1.65 and $1.85 per share for the full year. It shares were flat at $12.20.

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