Our friends over at ParkerLane, LLC shared with us a brief video they took yesterday at the Grand Opening of the Kentucky side of the Big Four Bridge pedestrian walkway.

The Big Four Bridge, which got its name from the now defunct Cleveland, Cincinnati, Chicago and St. Louis Railways (aka “the Big Four”), was built in 1895 as a 6-span railroad truss bridge. It was abandoned in the 1960s and access to the bridge was entirely shut off in 1969.

Since then the bridge has been considered an eyesore or an oddity, has been the site of a number of fires, and has been referred to as “The Bridge To Nowhere.”

http://youtu.be/l52xf3hhnPA

The opening of the bridge was highly anticipated, and the 66 degree temps and sunny weather contributed to the high spirits of pedestrians who made the crossing.

Another great video about Louisville’s Waterfront Park, directed by Peter Byck:

The Indiana portion of the Big Four Bridge is expected to be completed in four or five months.

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6 thoughts on “No longer the 'Bridge to Nowhere,' Big Four now the 'Bridge to halfway across the Ohio River'

  1. The big 4 bridges project is certainly a major asset and attraction for downtown Louisville. It’s just a shame that instead of embracing requirements to make the bridge easily accessible to those with disabilities the development was designed to skirt the requirements! The ADA requires that a ramp has a level resting area at regular intervals. In order to avoid this requirement, they designed the ramp with 4.95% of slope, which means according to regulations, it’s not a ramp (above 5% slope is considered a ramp). Now those with disabilities multiplying a 700’+ long ramp without a resting space. The original design also included an elevator for use by those with disabilities, but it was also dropped from the design.

  2. The big 4 bridges project is certainly a major asset and attraction for downtown Louisville. It’s just a shame that instead of embracing requirements to make the bridge easily accessible to those with disabilities the development was designed to skirt the requirements! The ADA requires that a ramp has a level resting area at regular intervals. In order to avoid this requirement, they designed the ramp with 4.95% of slope, which means according to regulations, it’s not a ramp (above 5% slope is considered a ramp). Now those with disabilities multiplying a 700’+ long ramp without a resting space. The original design also included an elevator for use by those with disabilities, but it was also dropped from the design.

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