The Louisville Metro Police Department is looking for a new location for the overcrowded impound lot in the Butchertown neighborhood. | Photo by Michael L. Jones

Louisville Metro Government has postponed a public meeting about its plan to use a warehouse in the California neighborhood as an alternative storage location for LMPD impound lot. The proposed site is located in an industrial area of the neighborhood and would ease overcrowding at the main Butchertown lot.

The meeting was scheduled to take place on Monday, August 13, at the California Community Center. Will Ford, a Louisville Forward spokesman, said a scheduling conflict caused the postponement, and the meeting will be rescheduled. He did not know how soon a new date would be announced but said the change has nothing to do with the plan itself.

Louisville Metro Government began looking for a new location for impound lot in January, due to space constraints and environmental issues at the current site. A public Request for Information was issued this year seeking properties that fit the city’s search criteria, but none of the seven responses were acceptable locations.

The LMPD Impound Lot was designed to hold about 1,800 vehicles but routinely houses nearly 2,300 vehicles a day. It is the main temporary storage area for cars towed from throughout the city and used as long-term storage for vehicles held as evidence in legal proceedings.

Towed vehicles can be auctioned off if the owner does not claim them after 45 days, but vehicles involved in criminal cases can sit in the lot for decades. This has led to a backlog of abandoned cars on the streets of Louisville.

The city hopes to ease the problem by sending impounded vehicles being held as evidence to a warehouse on Ninth Street. It would provide an indoor, secure location for these vehicles while decreasing the number of vehicles at the impound lot by about 350, according to the city.

Michael L. Jones
    Michael L. Jones, a freelance journalist and author, covers communities for Insider Louisville. His latest book "Louisville Jug Music: From Earl McDonald to the National Jubilee" (History Press) received the 2014 Samuel Thomas Book Award from the Louisville Historical League. In addition to his contributions to Insider, his writing appears regularly in LEO Weekly, Louisville Magazine, Food & Dining – Louisville Edition, and Who’s Who Louisville: African American Profiles. He also sits on the board of directors of the National Jug Band Jubilee. Jones and his wife, Melissa Amos-Jones, a physical therapist, live in the Kenwood Hills neighborhood near Iroquois Park.


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