(Editor’s note: This week, Chick-fil-A President Dan Cathy told the Baptist Press the Atlanta-based fast-food chain’s is “guilty as charged” in its corporate stance against gay marriage.)

It’s pretty clear the leadership at Chick-fil-A is homophobic, and the company is anti-gay and, if you aren’t, you’re probably swearing them off as hate-mongers and narrow-minded twits.

Don’t get me wrong, I am, too. It’ll be hard for me to financially support an organization whose president says such damning things publicly about not just gay marriage, but divorce as well.

But for those of you devout Christians out there, don’t get me wrong, either.

This issue isn’t as black-and-white as many make it out to be.

Philosophically, I found Dan Cathy’s reported comments to be incendiary, fear-based, hate-mongering and offensive. It’s a shame such narrow mindedness exists today. I thought Christians were supposed to be open, welcoming and accepting of others.

You don’t have to condone someone else’s behavior to follow your faith. And you don’t have to condemn it, either. Saying his company was “guilty as charged” for having a stance against gay marriage was a good answer: It’s criminal.

But let’s pull back for a moment, all of us – gay, straight, Christian or not – and consider a few items that make this less black-and-white and worth further thought:

• Dan Cathy didn’t say he hates gay people. He supports one side of a political issue. It doesn’t excuse the close-mindedness of the stance, but it’s not nearly as incendiary as many people are making it out to be with paraphrasing and third-generation repetition of what was actually said.

• Dan Cathy can’t speak for the entire organization. This is a personal issue, not a company one. Many Chick-fil-A stores are independently owned franchises and I’m guessing many are not run by people with their heads up their asses. (There’s a very crude joke about irony waiting to happen there.)

• Sensibility quickly returned to the company when a spokesman issued a statement saying Chick-fil-A prefers to leave the debate on this issue to the political realm and likely won’t be participating in any further discussion about it.

• I’m willing to bet if an obvious same sex couple went into Chick-fil-A today, they’d be treated with respect and served with the same, “My pleasure!” and friendly service we all get. Dan Cathy doesn’t get to implement bigotry with his employees. That would be against the law.

• Those who are offended by Dan Cathy’s statements are welcome to ban or boycott his company, but understand that your right to do so is the same one that allows him to say such things out loud. The bad comes with the good.

• Though I support love and marriage between anyone regardless of gender or other factors, I know the practicality of never eating at Chick-fil-A again is sticky. I have young children. I do not want to explain homosexuality or same-sex marriage to a four-year-old. And I can promise you that spending $18 at a company whose CEO is a narrow-minded, dim-wit is a lot better than breaking a daughter’s heart set on playing at Chick-fil-A on Saturday.

My plan is to avoid the restaurant from now on. But it’s foolish for those who think the company deserves what it’s going to get to believe Chick-fil-A will actually get it.

One man’s foolish quotes to a faith-based media outlet won’t bring the company down. If our principles are lucky, they’ll experience enough of a bottom-line effect they reconsider the public they serve and whether or not it’s a good idea to let Dan Cathy speak anymore.

It’s also short-sighted of us to think this is an easy decision or a black-and-white issue, regardless of how stomach-turning the comments.

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Jason Falls is a Louisville-based digital marketing and online communications consultant, professional speaker and educator. His marketing industry blog, SocialMediaExplorer.com, is consistently rated among the top 20 of its kind in the world by Advertising Age magazine.

81 thoughts on “Guest blogger Jason Falls: Is the Chick-fil-A anti-gay issue that simple?

  1. Calling boycotters “foolish” while committing to still patronize the restaurant, and using your 4-year old as a scapegoat? Apologist, please. How hard is it to tell a 4-year old, “we don’t eat there because those people are mean.” Is Chick-fil-A paying you for this pr?

    If we don’t explain homosexuality or same-sex marriage to our children, what happens when our kids turn out to be gay? Believing that only heterosexuality is ‘normal’ and ‘acceptable,’ the kids are more susceptible to self-hate externalized by drug and/or alcohol addiction. Promiscuous sex to fill the void of the lack of acceptance. Other times, the kids go straight….to suicide. Important to note these outcomes are not caused by the homosexuality, but by the lack of acceptance.

    “It isn’t black-and-white…”  is quite a bit easier to say when you speak from the privilege of heterosexuality. You’re part of a solution, or you’re part of a problem.

  2. Calling boycotters “foolish” while committing to still patronize the restaurant, and using your 4-year old as a scapegoat? Apologist, please. How hard is it to tell a 4-year old, “we don’t eat there because those people are mean.” Is Chick-fil-A paying you for this pr?

    If we don’t explain homosexuality or same-sex marriage to our children, what happens when our kids turn out to be gay? Believing that only heterosexuality is ‘normal’ and ‘acceptable,’ the kids are more susceptible to self-hate externalized by drug and/or alcohol addiction. Promiscuous sex to fill the void of the lack of acceptance. Other times, the kids go straight….to suicide. Important to note these outcomes are not caused by the homosexuality, but by the lack of acceptance.

    “It isn’t black-and-white…”  is quite a bit easier to say when you speak from the privilege of heterosexuality. You’re part of a solution, or you’re part of a problem.

  3. I thought “homophobic” means one fears homosexuality or homosexuals. I don’t think that’s what Chick-fil-A’s leadership is saying. What I gather it’s saying is it’s anti-homosexual behavior (in this case, marriage) and does not condone homosexual marriage. Let’s keep the terminology straight to be fair to all parties.

    <>Christians are supposed to follow the decrees of the Bible dictated by God. That, in and of itself, makes their behavior exclusive in that it should set them apart, just as Muslims and Jews and Hindus act differently based on their faiths. If you’re equating Christian acceptance with some “It doesn’t matter what you do, we love you anyway” belief, I encourage you to show me in the Bible where it says that. Perhaps I’ve missed something.

    Best I can tell, and I’ve read it through several times and studied it extensively, the basic message is this: love the sinner, hate the sin, follow God’s will. All three notions are pretty clearly detailed in the Bible. One message not in the Bible is “do what the popular culture says, even when it runs counter to God’s will.”

    Interesting how you and so many others demand love and tolerance for all, but you say Dan Cathy is a dim-wit, has his head up his ass, etc. Does tolerance only go one way? In this case, one party views the other wrong, and that party is criticized for it, but in your view, there’s only one right way and you feel free to be vulgar in your objections. Doesn’t seem terribly tolerant to me.

    Whether you agree with Chick-fil-A isn’t the real issue. The real issue is a privately held company is choosing to speak its mind on a touchy issue. And last I looked, privately held companies don’t have to change their operating philosophies based on what debatably popular sentiment says. Free speech, as far as I’m concerned.

    Don’t hold your breath that a boycott will change much. Privately held company, debt free, best comparable-store numbers in the business, extremely loyal franchisee base. Not easy to change.

  4. I thought “homophobic” means one fears homosexuality or homosexuals. I don’t think that’s what Chick-fil-A’s leadership is saying. What I gather it’s saying is it’s anti-homosexual behavior (in this case, marriage) and does not condone homosexual marriage. Let’s keep the terminology straight to be fair to all parties.

    <>Christians are supposed to follow the decrees of the Bible dictated by God. That, in and of itself, makes their behavior exclusive in that it should set them apart, just as Muslims and Jews and Hindus act differently based on their faiths. If you’re equating Christian acceptance with some “It doesn’t matter what you do, we love you anyway” belief, I encourage you to show me in the Bible where it says that. Perhaps I’ve missed something.

    Best I can tell, and I’ve read it through several times and studied it extensively, the basic message is this: love the sinner, hate the sin, follow God’s will. All three notions are pretty clearly detailed in the Bible. One message not in the Bible is “do what the popular culture says, even when it runs counter to God’s will.”

    Interesting how you and so many others demand love and tolerance for all, but you say Dan Cathy is a dim-wit, has his head up his ass, etc. Does tolerance only go one way? In this case, one party views the other wrong, and that party is criticized for it, but in your view, there’s only one right way and you feel free to be vulgar in your objections. Doesn’t seem terribly tolerant to me.

    Whether you agree with Chick-fil-A isn’t the real issue. The real issue is a privately held company is choosing to speak its mind on a touchy issue. And last I looked, privately held companies don’t have to change their operating philosophies based on what debatably popular sentiment says. Free speech, as far as I’m concerned.

    Don’t hold your breath that a boycott will change much. Privately held company, debt free, best comparable-store numbers in the business, extremely loyal franchisee base. Not easy to change.

  5. Whoa, wait. Marriage is anti-homosexual behavior? How, pray tell, do you define anti-homosexual behavior?

  6. Whoa, wait. Marriage is anti-homosexual behavior? How, pray tell, do you define anti-homosexual behavior?

  7. They can do whatever they want, of course. But they will start to pay a price in the market. If they want to remain anchored in the Southeast, they might be okay. But if they want to grow — especially on the west coast and the northeast — I think the company’s position will become increasingly problematic with customers in those areas. It’s already radioactive in some places:  note that a student backlash at Northeastern University just killed a planned Chick-fil-A on campus.
    It’s remarkable how quickly Americans’ positions on gay marriage are changing., especially young Americans’ views. Within five years, most younger customers will likely see funding anti-gay marriage groups as the pretty much the same as giving money to a group that’s opposed to interracial marriage.

  8. They can do whatever they want, of course. But they will start to pay a price in the market. If they want to remain anchored in the Southeast, they might be okay. But if they want to grow — especially on the west coast and the northeast — I think the company’s position will become increasingly problematic with customers in those areas. It’s already radioactive in some places:  note that a student backlash at Northeastern University just killed a planned Chick-fil-A on campus.
    It’s remarkable how quickly Americans’ positions on gay marriage are changing., especially young Americans’ views. Within five years, most younger customers will likely see funding anti-gay marriage groups as the pretty much the same as giving money to a group that’s opposed to interracial marriage.

  9. It sounds as if you’ve stepped foot in a Chick-fil-a before? Inside of every CFA is a sign that talks about why they’re closed on Sundays. On that sign is an image of their founder, Truett Cathy. Dan is his son. What Dan says is a big deal, because he is the face, voice, and wallet, of CFA’s all across the nation. If CFA were a pyramid (which, it kind of is, being a privately held franchise and all), Dan would be at the top. This isn’t like Frank, the owner of a CFA in some town, IA said these things. The figure head for CFA did. That’s fine. He is entitled to his opinion, and everyones right in that he didn’t say anything cruel or derogatory, just confirmed what we’ve all been saying for a long time, that he completely disagrees with homosexuality (and apparently divorce/blended families. Probably even single parenting. Maybe he can confirm that next time) 

    Chalking his statement up to nothing more than an opinion that he’s entitled to have and not worth reacting to, is not recognizing his position in this incredibly tight knit company. It’s an exceptionally big deal because he, personally, makes a profit off of every sale made at a CFA. That $18 benefits him, even if it’s only by a few cents. Not to mention CFA’s very tight standards for their franchises. They could almost be classified as a cult. The proof is in the way every single employee, at every single CFA, will respond with “my pleasure” when you say “thank you”. 

    I’m a little appalled at the excuse of not wanting to explain homosexuality to your four year old. If not now, then when? When you tell her santa isn’t real? Her whole child hood was composed of rainbows and fairy tales, thus making reality that much harsher. As the mother of a four year old, I think it may very well be the BEST time to discuss such “taboo” topics. My daughter has begun to notice skin color, the varying shapes and sizes of people, surely she could understand if I explained that some families aren’t a mom and a dad, but maybe two dads, or two moms. Or hell, maybe only one of either. I think you’re expecting you’re child to think that’s incredibly bazar when in all actuality, she likely wouldn’t give it much thought. If you want to get technical, tell her “some families are two dads or two moms, and the people at CFA feel like that’s not right, and they shouldn’t be allowed to be a family.” How else can we normalize this if we don’t teach our kids from a young age. 

  10. It sounds as if you’ve stepped foot in a Chick-fil-a before? Inside of every CFA is a sign that talks about why they’re closed on Sundays. On that sign is an image of their founder, Truett Cathy. Dan is his son. What Dan says is a big deal, because he is the face, voice, and wallet, of CFA’s all across the nation. If CFA were a pyramid (which, it kind of is, being a privately held franchise and all), Dan would be at the top. This isn’t like Frank, the owner of a CFA in some town, IA said these things. The figure head for CFA did. That’s fine. He is entitled to his opinion, and everyones right in that he didn’t say anything cruel or derogatory, just confirmed what we’ve all been saying for a long time, that he completely disagrees with homosexuality (and apparently divorce/blended families. Probably even single parenting. Maybe he can confirm that next time) 

    Chalking his statement up to nothing more than an opinion that he’s entitled to have and not worth reacting to, is not recognizing his position in this incredibly tight knit company. It’s an exceptionally big deal because he, personally, makes a profit off of every sale made at a CFA. That $18 benefits him, even if it’s only by a few cents. Not to mention CFA’s very tight standards for their franchises. They could almost be classified as a cult. The proof is in the way every single employee, at every single CFA, will respond with “my pleasure” when you say “thank you”. 

    I’m a little appalled at the excuse of not wanting to explain homosexuality to your four year old. If not now, then when? When you tell her santa isn’t real? Her whole child hood was composed of rainbows and fairy tales, thus making reality that much harsher. As the mother of a four year old, I think it may very well be the BEST time to discuss such “taboo” topics. My daughter has begun to notice skin color, the varying shapes and sizes of people, surely she could understand if I explained that some families aren’t a mom and a dad, but maybe two dads, or two moms. Or hell, maybe only one of either. I think you’re expecting you’re child to think that’s incredibly bazar when in all actuality, she likely wouldn’t give it much thought. If you want to get technical, tell her “some families are two dads or two moms, and the people at CFA feel like that’s not right, and they shouldn’t be allowed to be a family.” How else can we normalize this if we don’t teach our kids from a young age. 

  11. Cathy can have whatever thoughts he’d like…but, fact is, he’s put millions behind right wing extremist groups whose theologies have caused irreparable damage to some of our confused youth. I can’t excuse that.  

    Also, my children have known since they were old enough to ask- they’re 3rd and 1st grade now:  Most of the time, boys marry girls.  But, not all the time.  Sometimes, women love women and men love men, and that’s ok too.  We’re all born the way we are. 

  12. Cathy can have whatever thoughts he’d like…but, fact is, he’s put millions behind right wing extremist groups whose theologies have caused irreparable damage to some of our confused youth. I can’t excuse that.  

    Also, my children have known since they were old enough to ask- they’re 3rd and 1st grade now:  Most of the time, boys marry girls.  But, not all the time.  Sometimes, women love women and men love men, and that’s ok too.  We’re all born the way we are. 

  13. My children were 4, 5 and 9 when they found out I was gay.  It would be esay to tell your daughter that you don’t eat at Chik-fil-a because they hate some people for no good reason.

  14. My children were 4, 5 and 9 when they found out I was gay.  It would be esay to tell your daughter that you don’t eat at Chik-fil-a because they hate some people for no good reason.

  15. Hard decision or not, it IS a black-and-white decision . . . that is, if you see it as a civil rights issue. This isn’t about freedom of speech or religious choice; it’s about people and organizations that speak out and lobby against civil rights for all.  Mr. Cathy can say what he wants and do what he wants, believe what he wants and run the company as he wants.  The bottom line is that, if you believe in true equality and equal rights for all, you shouldn’t do business with Chick-Fil-A.  Period.

  16. Hard decision or not, it IS a black-and-white decision . . . that is, if you see it as a civil rights issue. This isn’t about freedom of speech or religious choice; it’s about people and organizations that speak out and lobby against civil rights for all.  Mr. Cathy can say what he wants and do what he wants, believe what he wants and run the company as he wants.  The bottom line is that, if you believe in true equality and equal rights for all, you shouldn’t do business with Chick-Fil-A.  Period.

  17. Where did I say that, Curtis? If I need to clarify then I’ll say, simply, that CFA is anti-gay marriage. And, to me, that doesn’t make them afraid of homosexuals, which is what, if broken down correctly, homophobic means. It is a commonly misused term.

  18. Where did I say that, Curtis? If I need to clarify then I’ll say, simply, that CFA is anti-gay marriage. And, to me, that doesn’t make them afraid of homosexuals, which is what, if broken down correctly, homophobic means. It is a commonly misused term.

  19. I, too, have read that book. It also says “no haircuts”.

    If you are a woman, the bible states that during during your period you are to stay away from men for a week and then bring 2 live pigeons for your priest to sacrifice on the alter of your church and cast its feathers in an eastern facing direction.(Leviticus 15:19-30) If you haven’t done that, according to the book, you are a sinner and an abomination to men. 

    If you want to believe in the Bible, that’s perfectly acceptable. But you have to believe in all of it.

    It is a profoundly stupid move to virtually eliminate so many potential customers by alienating them with this nonsense. I wish these people would take their own advice and “keep it to themselves”.

  20. I, too, have read that book. It also says “no haircuts”.

    If you are a woman, the bible states that during during your period you are to stay away from men for a week and then bring 2 live pigeons for your priest to sacrifice on the alter of your church and cast its feathers in an eastern facing direction.(Leviticus 15:19-30) If you haven’t done that, according to the book, you are a sinner and an abomination to men. 

    If you want to believe in the Bible, that’s perfectly acceptable. But you have to believe in all of it.

    It is a profoundly stupid move to virtually eliminate so many potential customers by alienating them with this nonsense. I wish these people would take their own advice and “keep it to themselves”.

  21. I’ll stand up for a boycotter’s right based on that argument any day. Free country. Their choice.

    But telling a child we’re not going there because “those people are mean” is a vague, obtuse untruth that begs the question, “Why are they mean, Dad?”

    Whaddya say, Curtis? “Well, because they’re against marriage between men who have anal sex with other men?” Let’s face it: that’s the endgame of that argument. Let’s quit dancing around all the PC nonsense and say it.

  22. I’ll stand up for a boycotter’s right based on that argument any day. Free country. Their choice.

    But telling a child we’re not going there because “those people are mean” is a vague, obtuse untruth that begs the question, “Why are they mean, Dad?”

    Whaddya say, Curtis? “Well, because they’re against marriage between men who have anal sex with other men?” Let’s face it: that’s the endgame of that argument. Let’s quit dancing around all the PC nonsense and say it.

  23. At least you’ve allowed room for my choice, Brian, and that’s all I ask. We don’t have to agree in this society in order to tolerate each other.

  24. At least you’ve allowed room for my choice, Brian, and that’s all I ask. We don’t have to agree in this society in order to tolerate each other.

  25. A four year old doesn’t possess the necessary thinking skills to wrap his/her head around any type of sexual explanation or conversation and therefore, cannot comprehend any of it. That’s why it’s better left to vague statements.

    Kids don’t require a lot of explaining. Sometimes “because they don’t treat everyone the same” is the best answer. More often, it seems to be the best answer for adults as well.

  26. A four year old doesn’t possess the necessary thinking skills to wrap his/her head around any type of sexual explanation or conversation and therefore, cannot comprehend any of it. That’s why it’s better left to vague statements.

    Kids don’t require a lot of explaining. Sometimes “because they don’t treat everyone the same” is the best answer. More often, it seems to be the best answer for adults as well.

  27. I know that Brian, and I also sense and appreciate the courtesy of your reply. Pushed into that conversational bind, I supposed I’d say, “Well, it’s not my favorite place,” and move along.

  28. I know that Brian, and I also sense and appreciate the courtesy of your reply. Pushed into that conversational bind, I supposed I’d say, “Well, it’s not my favorite place,” and move along.

  29. Appreciate everyone’s feedback. Good thoughts on how to explain things to my daughter from some of you. I’m not sure I want to approach sex of any kind with her at four, but I like the “that company doesn’t treat people well,” line. Will certainly ponder.

  30. Appreciate everyone’s feedback. Good thoughts on how to explain things to my daughter from some of you. I’m not sure I want to approach sex of any kind with her at four, but I like the “that company doesn’t treat people well,” line. Will certainly ponder.

  31. Brian, if you are going to talk about Christianity, you need to understand it better.

    The story of the Old Testament is about Man being separated from God. During that time, there were rules that had to be followed. (614 of them, if you’re counting.) Then, when Jesus (part Man and part God) was able to rectify things, there was a New Covenant (another word for Testament).

    Under the New Deal, people are saved through their own individual obedience, and the rules are much simpler. In fact, the commands were pretty much boiled down to Love God, Love your neighbor as yourself, and don’t go out of your way to piss each other off about the small stuff.  (There’s a whole book, Galatians, which is about the struggle with those who thought that Christians had to follow the New AND the Old Law — and those who realized that you didn’t have to become circumsized and follow 613 other decrees prior to baptism.)  In fact, under the Old Law, it was only the Jews who were granted temporary clemency for their sins, with the Chief Priest having to pray special prayers for those who violated the rules even without knowing it.

    All of that said, Dan Cathy stepped out into an area that he really shouldn’t have, and I have no sorrow for the impact to their bottom line.

    But if you’re going to try to use the Bible to tell others how they ought to behave, you’d be far better at it if you had an understanding of what it’s about.

  32. Brian, if you are going to talk about Christianity, you need to understand it better.

    The story of the Old Testament is about Man being separated from God. During that time, there were rules that had to be followed. (614 of them, if you’re counting.) Then, when Jesus (part Man and part God) was able to rectify things, there was a New Covenant (another word for Testament).

    Under the New Deal, people are saved through their own individual obedience, and the rules are much simpler. In fact, the commands were pretty much boiled down to Love God, Love your neighbor as yourself, and don’t go out of your way to piss each other off about the small stuff.  (There’s a whole book, Galatians, which is about the struggle with those who thought that Christians had to follow the New AND the Old Law — and those who realized that you didn’t have to become circumsized and follow 613 other decrees prior to baptism.)  In fact, under the Old Law, it was only the Jews who were granted temporary clemency for their sins, with the Chief Priest having to pray special prayers for those who violated the rules even without knowing it.

    All of that said, Dan Cathy stepped out into an area that he really shouldn’t have, and I have no sorrow for the impact to their bottom line.

    But if you’re going to try to use the Bible to tell others how they ought to behave, you’d be far better at it if you had an understanding of what it’s about.

  33. Thanks, but I don’t need the lecture. I attended catholic schools for 12 years. I have watched people go from loving a Jesus who was a sandal-wearing, long-haired freak who helped the poor to watching people worship a Jesus who hated taxes and gays. I don’t know what any of that is about.

    Those things you are talking about are only relevant to people who believe in it. That said, it is remarkable how you chose not to address the direct quote from the book. You seem to be saying the text is not to be taken literally. That is something many modern-day American Christians would take issue with, and is a discussion I do not intend to be involved in.

    I don’t use the bible to tell people how to live. But if you’re going to use it to tell me why I’m wrong, you have to let me quote it, too.

  34. Thanks, but I don’t need the lecture. I attended catholic schools for 12 years. I have watched people go from loving a Jesus who was a sandal-wearing, long-haired peace freak who helped the poor to watching people worship a Jesus who hated taxes and gays. I don’t know what any of that is about.

    Those things you are talking about are only relevant to people who believe in it. That said, it is remarkable how you chose not to address the direct quote from the book. You seem to be saying the text is not to be taken literally. That is something many modern-day American Christians would take issue with, and is a discussion I do not intend to be involved in.

    I don’t use the bible to tell people how to live. But if you’re going to use it to tell me why I’m wrong, you have to let me quote it, too.

  35. Col. Tucker, *you* were the one starting with the flippant comment about “no haircuts” and quoting Leviticus. Apparently, your 12 years in Catholic school didn’t address the difference between the New covenant and the old.

    If *you* are going to create straw men by taking scripture out of context, then I will call you out on it. Your little debate tactic has no place in polite society, when in the process you’re smearing tens of millions of Protestants by mis-characterizing their beliefs.

    The sad thing is that I agree with your main point, but detest like hell the lazy tactic and poor reasoning. There are many Christians who won’t abide by hate and intolerance, and they don’t cast out those who don’t follow Deuteronomy to the letter either.

  36. Col. Tucker, *you* were the one starting with the flippant comment about “no haircuts” and quoting Leviticus. Apparently, your 12 years in Catholic school didn’t address the difference between the New covenant and the old.

    If *you* are going to create straw men by taking scripture out of context, then I will call you out on it. Your little debate tactic has no place in polite society, when in the process you’re smearing tens of millions of Protestants by mis-characterizing their beliefs.

    The sad thing is that I agree with your main point, but detest like hell the lazy tactic and poor reasoning. There are many Christians who won’t abide by hate and intolerance, and they don’t cast out those who don’t follow Deuteronomy to the letter either.

  37. The corporation has donated millions to anti-gay hate groups (you know instead of sending that money to a charity that does something constructive, like feed the poor), so yes, Dan IS speaking for the corporation. The corporations priorities have been made clear, both in Cathy’s words and in their spending. 

  38. The corporation has donated millions to anti-gay hate groups (you know instead of sending that money to a charity that does something constructive, like feed the poor), so yes, Dan IS speaking for the corporation. The corporations priorities have been made clear, both in Cathy’s words and in their spending. 

  39. Honestly, why would you need to talk about this to a 4 year old? What could a 4 year old understand about corporate boycotts and legislative political battles? That’s all TMI for a 4 year old.

    It’s simple, you eat there or you don’t. 

    If you eat there, nothing to discuss. 

    If you don’t eat there you tell her you like KFC more. 

  40. Honestly, why would you need to talk about this to a 4 year old? What could a 4 year old understand about corporate boycotts and legislative political battles? That’s all TMI for a 4 year old.

    It’s simple, you eat there or you don’t. 

    If you eat there, nothing to discuss. 

    If you don’t eat there you tell her you like KFC more. 

  41. Are you saying as s a Jew  “my Bible” is about being estranged from God, and that the other Bible is about being with God. 

    Interesting since most Jews don’t try to convert anyone to our religion since we believe most everyone is going to Heaven, no matter if you believe that the Messiah has come or is still yet to appear.

  42. Are you saying as s a Jew  “my Bible” is about being estranged from God, and that the other Bible is about being with God. 

    Interesting since most Jews don’t try to convert anyone to our religion since we believe most everyone is going to Heaven, no matter if you believe that the Messiah has come or is still yet to appear.

  43. Exactly: “we don’t eat there because those people are mean.”

    This is how a 4 year old understands the world. Nothing more need be said.

  44. Exactly: “we don’t eat there because those people are mean.”

    This is how a 4 year old understands the world. Nothing more need be said.

  45. There are 3 Chick-fil-As within 3 miles of my home, and I won’t be eating at any of them. The franchisees likely knew what they were getting into when they purchased their franchises. And if they’re upset  then they should take it up with the franchisor. 

    Cathy contributes a lot of money (which he has because we buy his chicken) to anti LGBT causes, and he did call people who don’t share his bigoted beliefs “arrogant”. My guess is while he’ll keep his mouth shut, the contributions will continue. I don’t need to add to their coffers.

  46. Still easy: “Why are they mean, Dad?”

    “Some people don’t like other people and they don’t treat them very nicely. Remember when that mean girl picked on you on the play group and took your toys? It’s like that.” 

  47. There are 3 Chick-fil-As within 3 miles of my home, and I won’t be eating at any of them. The franchisees likely knew what they were getting into when they purchased their franchises. And if they’re upset  then they should take it up with the franchisor. 

    Cathy contributes a lot of money (which he has because we buy his chicken) to anti LGBT causes, and he did call people who don’t share his bigoted beliefs “arrogant”. My guess is while he’ll keep his mouth shut, the contributions will continue. I don’t need to add to their coffers.

  48. Still easy: “Why are they mean, Dad?”

    “Some people don’t like other people and they don’t treat them very nicely. Remember when that mean girl picked on you on the play group and took your toys? It’s like that.” 

  49.  I like you, Ike. You’re arguments are well-reasoned and consistent. That’s something to be proud of. And I know the difference between the Old and New, TYVM.

    I’m just commenting on this phenomenon of people saying (for instance) “I don’t approve of homosexuality. It’s in the bible that you’re not supposed to do that.”

    Well, there’s a lot of things you aren’t supposed to be doing according to the bible, along with a host of other things YOU ARE supposed to be doing. You either interpret the whole thing literally or you view it as a collection of stories that are trying to teach you how to live. You can’t do both.

  50.  I like you, Ike. You’re arguments are well-reasoned and consistent. That’s something to be proud of. And I know the difference between the Old and New, TYVM.

    I’m just commenting on this phenomenon of people saying (for instance) “I don’t approve of homosexuality. It’s in the bible that you’re not supposed to do that.”

    Well, there’s a lot of things you aren’t supposed to be doing according to the bible, along with a host of other things YOU ARE supposed to be doing. You either interpret the whole thing literally or you view it as a collection of stories that are trying to teach you how to live. You can’t do both.

  51. The child isn’t in charge, certainly not at 4 years old. You don’t have to justify every decision you make on their behalf. Part of being a good parent is recognizing it’s OK to tell the child no. 

    I’m rather certain most 4 year olds are pretty easy to distract with another shiny object. “But you love the free toys in a happy meal! (Or the crown at Burger King)”

  52. The child isn’t in charge, certainly not at 4 years old. You don’t have to justify every decision you make on their behalf. Part of being a good parent is recognizing it’s OK to tell the child no. 

    I’m rather certain most 4 year olds are pretty easy to distract with another shiny object. “But you love the free toys in a happy meal! (Or the crown at Burger King)”

  53. Nope, that’s not what I’m saying at all.

    I’m saying that if you’re going to characterize someone’s beliefs as part of critiquing them, you need to do it in the context of what they believe and not make things up.

    To tell a Christian that they are a hypocrite for not following Jewish law is crazy, just like telling a Jew they are hypocritical for not following Sharia. (same God, right?)

    (your point about whether the Messiah has arrived is right on point, by the way. if you believe he has, your direction is clear. if you believe he hasn’t, then there’s a book for you. and my whole argument isn’t predicated at all on my personal beliefs, other than my desire to make for damned sure that we understand what others truly believe before making judgments about them)

  54. Nope, that’s not what I’m saying at all.

    I’m saying that if you’re going to characterize someone’s beliefs as part of critiquing them, you need to do it in the context of what they believe and not make things up.

    To tell a Christian that they are a hypocrite for not following Jewish law is crazy, just like telling a Jew they are hypocritical for not following Sharia. (same God, right?)

    (your point about whether the Messiah has arrived is right on point, by the way. if you believe he has, your direction is clear. if you believe he hasn’t, then there’s a book for you. and my whole argument isn’t predicated at all on my personal beliefs, other than my desire to make for damned sure that we understand what others truly believe before making judgments about them)

  55. yes, we’re fairly easy. All those 600+ “rules” we realize most were relevant then and not so much now. Most of us aren’t into taking the Bible literally, and it strikes me that no matter what “version” of the Bible you believe in (if any) there’s something about not judging others. 

    We are ALL God’s children, no?
    And now I am off to a church to see a children’s play.

  56. yes, we’re fairly easy. All those 600+ “rules” we realize most were relevant then and not so much now. Most of us aren’t into taking the Bible literally, and it strikes me that no matter what “version” of the Bible you believe in (if any) there’s something about not judging others. 

    We are ALL God’s children, no?
    And now I am off to a church to see a children’s play.

  57. Brian, thanks for reeling me in. We have far more common ground than not, and I am sorry if I’ve been battling “Huffington Post” arguments instead of addressing yours.

    And I do agree… There are a lot of so-called-Christians who don’t understand the origins of their beliefs, and they can be among the worst for tossing scripture where it doesn’t belong. Context is hard, because we don’t have a lot of Aramaic speakers running around.

    Turns out those two commands that Jesus *did* give us are a heck of a lot harder to live up to than the 614 in the Old Testament. They start with proactive love and understanding.

    Thank you.

  58. Brian, thanks for reeling me in. We have far more common ground than not, and I am sorry if I’ve been battling “Huffington Post” arguments instead of addressing yours.

    And I do agree… There are a lot of so-called-Christians who don’t understand the origins of their beliefs, and they can be among the worst for tossing scripture where it doesn’t belong. Context is hard, because we don’t have a lot of Aramaic speakers running around.

    Turns out those two commands that Jesus *did* give us are a heck of a lot harder to live up to than the 614 in the Old Testament. They start with proactive love and understanding.

    Thank you.

  59. The man expressed his personal opinion about gay marriage and he’s homophobic? Get a grip on language, people.  Stop the demonizing of everybody who disagrees with you.  Boycott if you like.  I don’t go to Disney any more either. It’s a free country. But the majority of Americans actually agree with him.

  60. The man expressed his personal opinion about gay marriage and he’s homophobic? Get a grip on language, people.  Stop the demonizing of everybody who disagrees with you.  Boycott if you like.  I don’t go to Disney any more either. It’s a free country. But the majority of Americans actually agree with him.

  61. The definition of homophobic includes discriminating against homosexuals.  Don’t believe me, check a dictionary.

  62. The definition of homophobic includes discriminating against homosexuals.  Don’t believe me, check a dictionary.

  63. Excellent conclusion, boys. If we could have disputes that were handled that well, we might get somewhere in this society. Another point that should be made: Christ said he came not to abolish but to fulfill it, i.e. not break it during his life (no perfect Christ, no perfect sacrifice). But his fulfilling it, those who believed in him were “freed from the law.” That’s why we don’t draw on Leviticus as a measure of our daily routine. 

    I also went to Catholic schools 12 years, and we barely ever cracked the Bible. So little to no understanding at all of the Torah, Law or Prophets or, in our terms, the Old Testament. It wasn’t until someone dared me to read the Bible and quit arguing from a point of ignorance that I actually picked it up when I was 30. My life has never been the same.

  64. Excellent conclusion, boys. If we could have disputes that were handled that well, we might get somewhere in this society. Another point that should be made: Christ said he came not to abolish but to fulfill it, i.e. not break it during his life (no perfect Christ, no perfect sacrifice). But his fulfilling it, those who believed in him were “freed from the law.” That’s why we don’t draw on Leviticus as a measure of our daily routine. 

    I also went to Catholic schools 12 years, and we barely ever cracked the Bible. So little to no understanding at all of the Torah, Law or Prophets or, in our terms, the Old Testament. It wasn’t until someone dared me to read the Bible and quit arguing from a point of ignorance that I actually picked it up when I was 30. My life has never been the same.

  65. In school, we mainly studied the gospels and had barely a few weeks on the Old Testament. After I graduated high school, I went back and looked at it. I came to a different conclusion than you, but to each his own.

    I’ve never heard that before…being “freed from the law”. That would open up a whole new set of problems, wouldn’t it? Telling people who follow Jesus that they can discard the book from which he himself followed sounds a little suspect.
     
    But I am already free from it so it is no matter to me. You guys enjoy. All I ask is that you don’t make any rules for me based on it. Thanks!

  66. In school, we mainly studied the gospels and had barely a few weeks on the Old Testament. After I graduated high school, I went back and looked at it. I came to a different conclusion than you, but to each his own.

    I’ve never heard that before…being “freed from the law”. That would open up a whole new set of problems, wouldn’t it? Telling people who follow Jesus that they can discard the book from which he himself followed sounds a little suspect.
     
    But I am already free from it so it is no matter to me. You guys enjoy. All I ask is that you don’t make any rules for me based on it. Thanks!

  67. “Interesting how you and so many others demand love and tolerance for all, but you say Dan Cathy is a dim-wit, has his head up his ass, etc. Does tolerance only go one way?  In this case, one party views the other wrong, and that party is criticized for it, but in your view, there’s only one right way and you feel free to e vulgar in your objections. Doesn’t seem terribly tolerant to me.”
    Well said!
    Though I disagree with some of the statements made in the article, I can very much appreciate the breath of fresh air in your bringing light to the hipocrisy of people who are claiming to be so “tolerant,” as they, with vulgar words, hate the side with a differing position as them.
    Also so refreshing to see a person, a private family-owned company… with an ACTUAL CONVICTION….that sticks to that conviction…so rare in our day. 

  68. “Interesting how you and so many others demand love and tolerance for all, but you say Dan Cathy is a dim-wit, has his head up his ass, etc. Does tolerance only go one way?  In this case, one party views the other wrong, and that party is criticized for it, but in your view, there’s only one right way and you feel free to e vulgar in your objections. Doesn’t seem terribly tolerant to me.”
    Well said!
    Though I disagree with some of the statements made in the article, I can very much appreciate the breath of fresh air in your bringing light to the hipocrisy of people who are claiming to be so “tolerant,” as they, with vulgar words, hate the side with a differing position as them.
    Also so refreshing to see a person, a private family-owned company… with an ACTUAL CONVICTION….that sticks to that conviction…so rare in our day. 

  69. A little off topic, but they never say thank you- They wait for you to say thank you and then hit you with “my pleasure” every time. Try and get out of there without giving them the cue to say “my pleasure” and I bet you cant. It is (was) a standing joke when my coworkers would go there.

  70. A little off topic, but they never say thank you- They wait for you to say thank you and then hit you with “my pleasure” every time. Try and get out of there without giving them the cue to say “my pleasure” and I bet you cant. It is (was) a standing joke when my coworkers would go there.

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