Fernando Moya (left) and Yani Vozos (right) | Courtesy Fund for the Arts

Imagine Greater Louisville 2020, an initiative by the Fund for the Arts to use the arts to make changes in the city, celebrated its first year in action at an event on Tuesday.

The initiative, created to answer how arts and culture can help Louisville, has begun 14 of its 15 chief strategies and completed 35 of the 56 recommended actions in the plan, which puts the project way ahead of schedule, according to the organization.

“The community is coming together to embrace our world-class arts and cultural assets and leverage them in a major way,” said Christen Boone, Fund for the Arts president & CEO in a news release. “Together, we are making great strides to ensure our region is more competitive, creative, educational, inclusive and compassionate.”

According to the organization, key goals of Imagine Greater Louisville include:

  • Access: Arts, culture and creativity are fully integrated into daily life and accessible to everyone in every neighborhood, every day.
  • Cultivation: Greater Louisville is a magnet for artists and creative professionals, where arts and culture organizations and creative industries, both institutional and emerging, are thriving.
  • Education: Every child in our community has the opportunity to experience and participate in arts.
  • Inclusion: Cultural equity is leading the way to a more equitable, diverse and inclusive community improving the social equity and cultural vitality of the region.
  • Promotion: Greater Louisville is recognized nationally and internationally as a leading city of arts and culture attracting talent to live and work here and tourists to stay and play.

The organization also gives grants to projects and so far $250,000 has been awarded. Some projects include a sensory-friendly production of “Hamlet” at Western Middle School and an artist refugee program through Kentucky Refugee Ministries.

Coming in 2018 is the Collective Impact Data tool, which will allow the Greater Louisville arts community to report the collective impact outcomes of their projects.

Lisa Hornung a native of Louisville and has worked in local media for more than 15 years as a writer and editor. Before that she worked as a writer, editor and photographer for community newspapers in Kansas, Ohio and Kentucky. She has a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the University of Georgia, and after a 20-year career in journalism, she obtained a master’s degree in history from Eastern Kentucky University in 2016.


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