Superior Market exteriorSuperior Market produce 1Superior Market aisle 1Superior Market cerealSuperior Market coolerSuperior Produce deliSuperior Market salad bar
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Superior Market & Deli is now open at 305 W. Broadway, bringing groceries to an area in need. | Photo by Kevin Gibson

A few doors down from the Brown Theater on busy Broadway might seem an unlikely place for a grocery store, but Superior Market & Deli, which opened this week, is a welcome addition to a neighborhood where such stores are basically extinct.

On a recent afternoon, there were a few people shopping the handful of aisles and a few people sitting at a lunch counter facing Broadway. One woman was fixing a salad at the salad bar in the deli area of the 5,400-square-foot store.

“It’s been wonderful,” store manager Wayne Collins said, asked about the response so far. “Everybody is so excited about us being here.”

He said nearby apartment residents, in particular, including those living in floors above the store, located at 305 W. Broadway, have been most welcoming, but local workers also have been in.

Superior Market & Deli is akin to a New York bodega (although without a resident cat, it would seem), not a full-service grocery store, but carrying enough to be dependable for basic supplies. Three aisles of packaged goods sit parallel to a full cooler and frozen foods aisle.

Superior Market & Deli plans to expand its inventory based on customer needs. | Photo by Kevin Gibson

A few racks of fresh fruit and vegetables sit along a glass-paned perimeter, holding baskets of produce like onions, potatoes, cucumbers and head lettuce, along with fruit like apples, limes, bananas and pineapples.

The store even has some coconuts.

Surrounding aisles are stocked with cereal, buns, canned fruit, crackers, chips and snacks, canned foods, fruit juices and so forth.

If you need paper products, Superior Market has it covered, from paper plates to paper towels to bathroom tissue. One aisle is loaded with cleaning items and pet food.

A long cooler, which has plenty of room to expand inventory, holds more fruit and vegetables, such as strawberries, avocados and peppers, as well as milk, eggs, butter, cheese and so forth. Across the aisle, aa freezer holds a variety of frozen foods, from pizza to ice cream.

There are even a few baked goods for sale, just across from a large cooler filled with cold drinks (including Jarritos), as well as a soft drink fountain.

The deli, which is served by a trio of tables and counter seating, offers personal pizzas and deli sandwiches in a build-your-own format. Fourteen toppings are available for pizzas, while sandwiches can be built with smoked honey ham, oven roasted turkey breast, salami, roast beef and more, with a choice of four types of bread, plus a selection of cheeses and toppings.

Customers also can order sandwiches such as grilled cheese, a Rueben, turkey avocado BLT and others. Sandwich prices top out at around $7. Pizzas are $7 with one meat and up to five vegetable toppings.

The salad bar offers three different greens to start with, and a selection of ingredients ranging from mushrooms to cucumbers, as well as eggs and chicken to top off your meal.

Judging from a quick scan, grocery prices are perhaps 10% more than at a large grocery store.

“We’re trying to keep everything affordable,” Collins said, adding that inventory will grow and change based on customers’ needs and requests.

Hours are 6 a.m.-9 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

Kevin Gibson

Kevin Gibson

Kevin Gibson tackles the 3Rs — retail, restaurants, real estate — plus, economic development. He loves bacon, loathes cucumbers and once interviewed Yoko Ono. Check out his books, “Louisville Beer: Derby City History on Draft” and “100 Things to do in Louisville Before You Die.” He has won numerous awards for his work but doesn’t know where most of them are now. In his spare time, he plays in a band called the Uncommon Houseflies.Email Kevin at [email protected]